"I have done bad things. I can’t take them back, and they are part of who I am. Most of the time, they seem like the only thing I am."
— Veronica Roth, Insurgent (via simply-quotes)
asylum-art:

 Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale
From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.
Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.
asylum-art:

 Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale
From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.
Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.
asylum-art:

 Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale
From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.
Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.
asylum-art:

 Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale
From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.
Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.
asylum-art:

 Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale
From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.
Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.
asylum-art:

 Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale
From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.
Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.
asylum-art:

 Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale
From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.
Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.
asylum-art:

 Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale
From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.
Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.
asylum-art:

 Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale
From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.
Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.
asylum-art:

 Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale
From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.
Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.

asylum-art:

Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale

From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.

Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.

"Instead of a watchlist limited to actual, known terrorists, the government has built a vast system based on the unproven and flawed premise that it can predict if a person will commit a terrorist act in the future,” says Hina Shamsi, the head of the ACLU’s National Security Project. “On that dangerous theory, the government is secretly blacklisting people as suspected terrorists and giving them the impossible task of proving themselves innocent of a threat they haven’t carried out.” Shamsi, who reviewed the document, added, “These criteria should never have been kept secret."

ridesabike:

Elaine Stritch rests her bike, reads a note, almost causes a riot.      

NEW YORK, June 26—TOLD TO KEEP HER SHIRT ON – Blonde Elaine Stritch, understudy to Ethel Merman in the Broadway hit, “Call Me Madam,” wears halter and shorts which cause her arrest in Central Park. Today she was fined $1 and told by Magistrate Emilio Jones, “A beautiful girl like you could cause a small riot and cause a large crowd to collect by removing your shirt.” “Well,” she replied, “I was there all day and nothing happened.” (AP, 1951)

descentintotyranny:

MSNBC Contributor Slams Network For Pro-Israel Coverage: ‘We Are Ridiculous!’

July 21 2014

During an interview on “Ronan Farrow Daily,” Palestinian journalist Rula Jebreal unloaded on Western media outlets, including MSNBC, arguing that influence from pro-Israel forces makes the news coverage more favorable to the likes of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Because of AIPAC, and because of the money behind it, and because of Sheldon Adelson, and because of all of us in the media. We are ridiculous. We are disgustingly biased when it comes to this issue," Jebreal said.

"Look at how many airtime Netanyahu and his folks have on air on a daily basis. Andrea Mitchell and others," she continued, referring to the MSNBC stalwart whose show airs right before Farrow’s afternoon program. "I never see one Palestinian being interviewed on theses same issues."

When Farrow pushed back gently and pointed out that Palestinian guests have been interviewed, Jebreal continued her criticism.

"Maybe 30 seconds! And then you have 25 minutes for Bibi Netanyahu, and then half an hour for Naftali Bennett and many others," Jebreal said.

Jebreal wasn’t done. She went on to call out NBC News for the recent kerfuffle surrounding Ayman Mohyeldin, the foreign correspondent who was abruptly pulled off the network’s coverage of the Israel-Hamas conflict last week.

Mohyeldin was eventually sent back to Gaza this weekend after his removal from the region — which NBC said was due to security concerns — sparked a fierce public backlash.

Jebreal, it turns out, is among the critics who believes Mohyeldin was taken off the story for political reasons.

"Listen, the Ayman Mohyeldin story, let’s talk about this. We are home and we can discuss this. Ayman Mohyeldin is covering the Palestinian side and we get upset," she said. "It’s too pro-Palestinian. We don’t like it. We push him back and thanks for social media that brought him in.

The criticism clearly made Farrow uncomfortable, and he could only respond to Jebreal’s points with a vague counter.

"Point taken, but doesn’t it reveal equally our thinking that we now have Ayman Mohyeldin on air and I think there’s been very fair and balanced coverage?" he said.

"Yes, thanks to social media, and thanks for the pushback from the public opinion," Jebreal responded. "And I’m not saying that everybody is like this, but it’s one-tenth is given to the Palestinian voice and 99 percent of the Israelis voice. And that’s why the public opinion is pro-Israeli, which is the opposite in the rest of the world."

"You are personally responsible for becoming more ethical than the society you grew up in."
— Eliezer Yudkowsky  (via binhcao)

(Source: abundance-mine)

seekingwillow:

Cops Are Highway Robbers: And It’s Legal.

“The eye-opening event was pulling those files,” Guillory told me. One of the first cases that caught his attention was titled State of Texas vs. One Gold Crucifix. The police had confiscated a simple gold cross that a woman wore around her neck…

"

In the over thee weeks of its military operation, Israel has demolished 3,175 homes, at least a dozen with families inside; destroyed five hospitals and six clinics; partially damaged sixty-four mosques and two churches; partially to completely destroyed eight government ministries; injured 4,620; and killed over 700 Palestinians. At plain sight, these numbers indicate Israel’s egregious violations of humanitarian law, ones that amount to war crimes.

Beyond the body count and reference to law, which is a product of power, the question to ask is, What is Israel’s end goal? What if Hamas and Islamic Jihad dug tunnels beneath the entirety of the Gaza Strip—they clearly did not, but let us assume they did for the sake of argument. According to Israel’s logic, all of Gaza’s 1.8 million Palestinians are therefore human shields for being born Palestinian in Gaza. The solution is to destroy the 360-kilometer square strip of land and to expect a watching world to accept this catastrophic loss as incidental. This is possible only by framing and accepting the dehumanization of Palestinian life. Despite the absurdity of this proposal, it is precisely what Israeli society is urging its military leadership to do. Israel cannot bomb Palestinians into submission, and it certainly cannot bomb them into peace.

"

historicaltimes:

Flight Lieutenant George Aird AFC, a test pilot with the De Havilland Aircraft Company, ejecting from an English Electric Lightning P1B XG 332 on 13 September 1962.

Read More

teded:

A Guide to the Energy of the Earth

Energy moves in and out of Earth’s physical systems, and during any energy transfer between them, some energy is lost to the surroundings as heat, light, sound, vibration, or movement.

Our planet’s energy comes from internal and external sources. Geothermal energy from radioactive isotopes and rotational energy from the spinning of the Earth are internal sources of energy, while the Sun is the major external source, driving certain systems, like our weather and our climate.

Sunlight warms the surface and atmosphere in varying amounts, and this causes convection, producing winds and influencing ocean currents. Infrared radiation, radiating out from the warmed surface of the Earth, gets trapped by greenhouse gases and further affects the energy flow.

From the TED-Ed Lesson A guide to the energy of the Earth - Joshua M. Sneideman

Animation by Marc Christoforidis

lifeisjustbe:

ilovekartoffeln:

Bless this man

Important.
lifeisjustbe:

ilovekartoffeln:

Bless this man

Important.
lifeisjustbe:

ilovekartoffeln:

Bless this man

Important.
lifeisjustbe:

ilovekartoffeln:

Bless this man

Important.
lifeisjustbe:

ilovekartoffeln:

Bless this man

Important.
lifeisjustbe:

ilovekartoffeln:

Bless this man

Important.
lifeisjustbe:

ilovekartoffeln:

Bless this man

Important.

lifeisjustbe:

ilovekartoffeln:

Bless this man

Important.

(Source: vagabondedlife)

america-wakiewakie:

"How large is America’s prison problem? More than 2.4 million people are behind bars in the United States today, either awaiting trial or serving a sentence. That’s more than the combined population of 15 states, all but three U.S. cities, and the U.S. armed forces. They’re scattered throughout a constellation of 102 federal prisons, 1,719 state prisons, 2,259 juvenile facilities, 3,283 local jails, and many more military, immigration, territorial, and Indian Countryfacilities.”

— The Leader of the Unfree World | The Atlantic 

headcanonish:

(via Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic ‘spirit’ masks | The Times of Israel)
Masks were one of the earliest forms of magic. Before wizards learned the crafting of wands, wizards crafted masks with magical attributes for the wearers to assume. The ancient history behind those masks allows masks, even non-magical ones, to inspire primal emotion today.
headcanonish:

(via Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic ‘spirit’ masks | The Times of Israel)
Masks were one of the earliest forms of magic. Before wizards learned the crafting of wands, wizards crafted masks with magical attributes for the wearers to assume. The ancient history behind those masks allows masks, even non-magical ones, to inspire primal emotion today.
headcanonish:

(via Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic ‘spirit’ masks | The Times of Israel)
Masks were one of the earliest forms of magic. Before wizards learned the crafting of wands, wizards crafted masks with magical attributes for the wearers to assume. The ancient history behind those masks allows masks, even non-magical ones, to inspire primal emotion today.
headcanonish:

(via Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic ‘spirit’ masks | The Times of Israel)
Masks were one of the earliest forms of magic. Before wizards learned the crafting of wands, wizards crafted masks with magical attributes for the wearers to assume. The ancient history behind those masks allows masks, even non-magical ones, to inspire primal emotion today.
headcanonish:

(via Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic ‘spirit’ masks | The Times of Israel)
Masks were one of the earliest forms of magic. Before wizards learned the crafting of wands, wizards crafted masks with magical attributes for the wearers to assume. The ancient history behind those masks allows masks, even non-magical ones, to inspire primal emotion today.
headcanonish:

(via Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic ‘spirit’ masks | The Times of Israel)
Masks were one of the earliest forms of magic. Before wizards learned the crafting of wands, wizards crafted masks with magical attributes for the wearers to assume. The ancient history behind those masks allows masks, even non-magical ones, to inspire primal emotion today.
headcanonish:

(via Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic ‘spirit’ masks | The Times of Israel)
Masks were one of the earliest forms of magic. Before wizards learned the crafting of wands, wizards crafted masks with magical attributes for the wearers to assume. The ancient history behind those masks allows masks, even non-magical ones, to inspire primal emotion today.
headcanonish:

(via Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic ‘spirit’ masks | The Times of Israel)
Masks were one of the earliest forms of magic. Before wizards learned the crafting of wands, wizards crafted masks with magical attributes for the wearers to assume. The ancient history behind those masks allows masks, even non-magical ones, to inspire primal emotion today.
headcanonish:

(via Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic ‘spirit’ masks | The Times of Israel)
Masks were one of the earliest forms of magic. Before wizards learned the crafting of wands, wizards crafted masks with magical attributes for the wearers to assume. The ancient history behind those masks allows masks, even non-magical ones, to inspire primal emotion today.

headcanonish:

(via Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic ‘spirit’ masks | The Times of Israel)

Masks were one of the earliest forms of magic. Before wizards learned the crafting of wands, wizards crafted masks with magical attributes for the wearers to assume. The ancient history behind those masks allows masks, even non-magical ones, to inspire primal emotion today.

iguanamouth:

youre gonna look so godamn cool
iguanamouth:

youre gonna look so godamn cool
iguanamouth:

youre gonna look so godamn cool

iguanamouth:

youre gonna look so godamn cool